Marketing 101 for developers

You’ve got mean coding skills but why would you ever really need fluffy marketing? No-one likes being sold to, right? But… whether it’s selling yourself, promoting your app or making sure people know about your website, sometimes marketing is a necessary evil. If you need some tips and tactics, you might find this useful. If you’ve been there done that, let us know what’s worked for you!

Seven Principles of Marketing

If you follow these principles you’ll ensure marketing is intrinsic to your product/service/app/website and have a better chance of success.

  1. Your customer
    If you start by understanding your customer and know exactly who they are then you can understand what they need and the value your product or service can give them. Customers have a greater choice now then they’ve ever had – why should they choose your product or service? What do you know they like that you can ingrain into the product or service you give them, like humour in the content for example. Change your thinking from how do I sell my app to why would someone want to buy my app?
  2. Your product/service
    It sounds basic but you really have to know your product or the service you’re providing inside out. How is it different or better than similar products or services? Work on a 30 second pitch to explain succinctly what it is your product or service does so you can tell anyone in a simple, clear way.
  3. Your competition
    You may have a fantastic app but unless you know what competing apps are in the Store and what people think of them then you could end up on the back foot. It’s not enough just to know who your competitors are,  you need to understand them and respect them. What would they say about you?
  4. Your impact
    Focus on executing on big things that have lots of impact rather than lots of little actions that have less impact.
  5. Your plan
    You need a plan to agree what activity you’re going to do and measure how effective it is, so you can adapt accordingly. But don’t spend too much time on the plan – decide what you’re going to do and then get on with it – buildings don’t grow until you’ve laid at row of bricks – but you need to be able to adapt to change.
  6. Your customer focus
    When you start doing the activity you’ve planned make sure you know what you want the customer to do as a result. Then you can effectively measure your success by monitoring reviews, testimonials, twitter comments, ratings etc. You need to be available for people to resolve issues as bad news travels fast. Listen to your feedback and use it to improve your product/service. What you say in your app is as important as what it does – make sure you have great content and headlines and a tone of voice that resonates with your users.
  7. Your proactivity
    Do some research to help you keep ahead – based on what’s worked so far, what do you think your customers might want in future (they’re probably telling you in comments and feedback). What trends are happening in your industry that indicate what the market’s going to do? Think ahead and be proactive as well as reactive and make sure you keep on top of the competition.

Tip: If all other six principles are working correctly it should make number 7 easier.

Got the bug? Get more marketing tips and advice from Lorraine Starr of Yippee Entertainment, who published the popular game Chimpact, plus find out how to monetise your app through ads from Mark Allen at Ranyart Systems.

Published by Sara Allison

Sara is the editor of Ubelly - when not heads down scouring Ubelly articles for typos (and not always catching them), she's scouting for new writing talent. Give her a shout @SaraAllison if you've got something to say about development/design and want to be heard.

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  1. Pingback:Marketing 101 for developers - Microsoft UK Students - Site Home - MSDN Blogs

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